7.04—13.05.17
Tom Fecht
Gravity Fields

7.04—13.05.17
Tom Fecht
Gravity Fields

7.04—13.05.17
Tom Fecht
Gravity Fields

7.04—13.05.17
Tom Fecht
Gravity Fields

7.04—13.05.17
Tom Fecht
Gravity Fields

“Penetrating night is one thing. But to be penetrated by the night is something entirely different, as this entails experiences that are substantially larger and older than we are.” (Tom Fecht)

The title of the exhibition – Gravity Fields – alludes to the invisible, physical forces that determine our world and pervade the infinite cosmic space. Human beings feel the physical pull of gravity directly, experiencing the solidity of the body as well as a connexion to the ground and the world through it.

With this first solo exhibition, it is a great pleasure for us to present an insight into Tom Fecht’s series of photographic works, which portray the relationship between mankind and the universal forces of nature.

The photographs were taken exclusively during the night with the light of the moon and the stars as a source of light. The different series concentrate on either the movement of the sea (Eclipse, Nocturne, Tide, Gravity Field) or the nocturnal sky (Incertitude, Cosmos),

“Penetrating night is one thing. But to be penetrated by the night is something entirely different, as this entails experiences that are substantially larger and older than we are.” (Tom Fecht)

The title of the exhibition – Gravity Fields – alludes to the invisible, physical forces that determine our world and pervade the infinite cosmic space. Human beings feel the physical pull of gravity directly, experiencing the solidity of the body as well as a connexion to the ground and the world through it.

With this first solo exhibition, it is a great pleasure for us to present an insight into Tom Fecht’s series of photographic works, which portray the relationship between mankind and the universal forces of nature.

The photographs were taken exclusively during the night with the light of the moon and the stars as a source of light. The different series concentrate on either the movement of the sea (Eclipse, Nocturne, Tide, Gravity Field) or the nocturnal sky (Incertitude, Cosmos),

“Penetrating night is one thing. But to be penetrated by the night is something entirely different, as this entails experiences that are substantially larger and older than we are.” (Tom Fecht)

The title of the exhibition – Gravity Fields – alludes to the invisible, physical forces that determine our world and pervade the infinite cosmic space. Human beings feel the physical pull of gravity directly, experiencing the solidity of the body as well as a connexion to the ground and the world through it.

With this first solo exhibition, it is a great pleasure for us to present an insight into Tom Fecht’s series of photographic works, which portray the relationship between mankind and the universal forces of nature.

The photographs were taken exclusively during the night with the light of the moon and the stars as a source of light. The different series concentrate on either the movement of the sea (Eclipse, Nocturne, Tide, Gravity Field) or the nocturnal sky (Incertitude, Cosmos),

“Penetrating night is one thing. But to be penetrated by the night is something entirely different, as this entails experiences that are substantially larger and older than we are.” (Tom Fecht)

The title of the exhibition – Gravity Fields – alludes to the invisible, physical forces that determine our world and pervade the infinite cosmic space. Human beings feel the physical pull of gravity directly, experiencing the solidity of the body as well as a connexion to the ground and the world through it.

With this first solo exhibition, it is a great pleasure for us to present an insight into Tom Fecht’s series of photographic works, which portray the relationship between mankind and the universal forces of nature.

The photographs were taken exclusively during the night with the light of the moon and the stars as a source of light. The different series concentrate on either the movement of the sea (Eclipse, Nocturne, Tide, Gravity Field) or the nocturnal sky (Incertitude, Cosmos),

“Penetrating night is one thing. But to be penetrated by the night is something entirely different, as this entails experiences that are substantially larger and older than we are.” (Tom Fecht)

The title of the exhibition – Gravity Fields – alludes to the invisible, physical forces that determine our world and pervade the infinite cosmic space. Human beings feel the physical pull of gravity directly, experiencing the solidity of the body as well as a connexion to the ground and the world through it.

With this first solo exhibition, it is a great pleasure for us to present an insight into Tom Fecht’s series of photographic works, which portray the relationship between mankind and the universal forces of nature.

The photographs were taken exclusively during the night with the light of the moon and the stars as a source of light. The different series concentrate on either the movement of the sea (Eclipse, Nocturne, Tide, Gravity Field) or the nocturnal sky (Incertitude, Cosmos), their abstraction enabling each motif to have both an analytical quality and a material one. The human perception of space and proportions is challenged, or rather opened up, as one of the titles already suggests: Incertitude, the incertitude of the look and of seeing.

Centre how you pull yourself
from all, even the airborne
regaining yourself, centre, you strongest.
Standing upright:
like a drink through thirst,
gravity plunges.
But from the sleeping falls,
as from a laden cloud,
abundant rain of heaviness.

(“Force of Gravity”, Rainer Maria Rilke, 1924)

their abstraction enabling each motif to have both an analytical quality and a material one. The human perception of space and proportions is challenged, or rather opened up, as one of the titles already suggests: Incertitude, the incertitude of the look and of seeing.

Centre how you pull yourself
from all, even the airborne
regaining yourself, centre, you strongest.
Standing upright:
like a drink through thirst,
gravity plunges.
But from the sleeping falls,
as from a laden cloud,
abundant rain of heaviness.

(“Force of Gravity”, Rainer Maria Rilke, 1924)

their abstraction enabling each motif to have both an analytical quality and a material one. The human perception of space and proportions is challenged, or rather opened up, as one of the titles already suggests: Incertitude, the incertitude of the look and of seeing.

Centre how you pull yourself
from all, even the airborne
regaining yourself, centre, you strongest.
Standing upright:
like a drink through thirst,
gravity plunges.
But from the sleeping falls,
as from a laden cloud,
abundant rain of heaviness.

(“Force of Gravity”, Rainer Maria Rilke, 1924)

their abstraction enabling each motif to have both an analytical quality and a material one. The human perception of space and proportions is challenged, or rather opened up, as one of the titles already suggests: Incertitude, the incertitude of the look and of seeing.

Centre how you pull yourself
from all, even the airborne
regaining yourself, centre, you strongest.
Standing upright:
like a drink through thirst,
gravity plunges.
But from the sleeping falls,
as from a laden cloud,
abundant rain of heaviness.

(“Force of Gravity”, Rainer Maria Rilke, 1924)

their abstraction enabling each motif to have both an analytical quality and a material one. The human perception of space and proportions is challenged, or rather opened up, as one of the titles already suggests: Incertitude, the incertitude of the look and of seeing.

Centre how you pull yourself
from all, even the airborne
regaining yourself, centre, you strongest.
Standing upright:
like a drink through thirst,
gravity plunges.
But from the sleeping falls,
as from a laden cloud,
abundant rain of heaviness.

(“Force of Gravity”, Rainer Maria Rilke, 1924)

 

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