05.06.—13.07.19
Jan Hoeft
Your True Self

05.06.—13.07.19
Jan Hoeft
Your True Self

05.06.—13.07.19
Jan Hoeft
Your True Self

05.06.—13.07.19
Jan Hoeft
Your True Self

05.06.—13.07.19
Jan Hoeft
Your True Self

Two indoor plants, Dieffenbachia maculata and Monstera deliciosa, are placed on an electric turntable and move slowly around their own axis. Each time they rotate, their leaves swipe across the screen of a tablet PC, which shows keys on several key rings from several different perspectives. With each swipe, you see a slogan gradually appear across the screen spelling out: YOUR TRUE SELF. Polypropylene hollow chamber panels are mounted with complex aluminium suspensions on the walls of the exhibition. The surface is broken in many places: cable-ties pull the soft plastic at its corners under tension together and the exhibition title as well as arrows pointing in different directions were milled into the material. The porous, open areas reveal those elements that go rather unnoticed in the industry, and that hardly experience their qualitative esteem in daily viewing: outdoor advertising and architectural renderings on construction boards. In the exhibition, stock photographs are printed on the hollow chamber sheets. One can see landscape views similar to those from the Windows XP screen background and the photography from a large public functional architecture, reminiscent of an airport or an office building. Furthermore, different details of feet and legs are represented. The surfaces of these feet were perforated in some sensitive places by steel bolts, such as the ball of the foot, the heel, or the ankles. Shiny keys hang from these bolts, from which key rings are connected in complex arrangements. If you take a closer look, you will notice that these keys have no profile; they are key blanks 

Two indoor plants, Dieffenbachia maculata and Monstera deliciosa, are placed on an electric turntable and move slowly around their own axis. Each time they rotate, their leaves swipe across the screen of a tablet PC, which shows keys on several key rings from several different perspectives. With each swipe, you see a slogan gradually appear across the screen spelling out: YOUR TRUE SELF. Polypropylene hollow chamber panels are mounted with complex aluminium suspensions on the walls of the exhibition. The surface is broken in many places: cable-ties pull the soft plastic at its corners under tension together and the exhibition title as well as arrows pointing in different directions were milled into the material. The porous, open areas reveal those elements that go rather unnoticed in the industry, and that hardly experience their qualitative esteem in daily viewing: outdoor advertising and architectural renderings on construction boards. In the exhibition, stock photographs are printed on the hollow chamber sheets. One can see landscape views similar to those from the Windows XP screen background and the photography from a large public functional architecture, reminiscent of an airport or an office building. Furthermore, different details of feet and legs are represented. The surfaces of these feet were perforated in some sensitive places by steel bolts, such as the ball of the foot, the heel, or the ankles. Shiny keys hang from these bolts, from which key rings are connected in complex arrangements. If you take a closer look, you will notice that these keys have no profile; they are key blanks Two indoor plants, Dieffenbachia maculata and Monstera deliciosa, are placed on an electric turntable and move slowly around their own axis. Each time they rotate, their leaves swipe across the screen of a tablet PC, which shows keys on several key rings from several different perspectives. With each swipe, you see a slogan gradually appear across the screen spelling out: YOUR TRUE SELF. Polypropylene hollow chamber panels are mounted with complex aluminium suspensions on the walls of the exhibition. The surface is broken in many places: cable-ties pull the soft plastic at its corners under tension together and the exhibition title as well as arrows pointing in different directions were milled into the material. The porous, open areas reveal those elements that go rather unnoticed in the industry, and that hardly experience their qualitative esteem in daily viewing: outdoor advertising and architectural renderings on construction boards. In the exhibition, stock photographs are printed on the hollow chamber sheets. One can see landscape views similar to those from the Windows XP screen background and the photography from a large public functional architecture, reminiscent of an airport or an office building. Furthermore, different details of feet and legs are represented. The surfaces of these feet were perforated in some sensitive places by steel bolts, such as the ball of the foot, the heel, or the ankles. Shiny keys hang from these bolts, from which key rings are connected in complex arrangements. If you take a closer look, you will notice that these keys have no profile; they are key blanks that decorate the feet like elaborate jewellery and, without their individual serrated profile, point away from their functional attributes.
The keys, cable-ties and polypropylene hollow chambers receive a new attention in the exhibition space with regard to their material qualities. The formal and material qualities are declared as the aesthetic element of the composition. They fit into a poetic pairing that makes the ciphers and materials of a synchronized and clocked society visible.

YOUR TRUE SELF - Is that the direction to which the arrows point? Will they take me to the place where the keys will fit? Just as the rotating plants set the rhythm for the change of direction, the arrows, like traffic signs and advertising messages, offer the recipient a supposed orientation aid in the chaos between systematic urban planning and industrial progress.
Jan Hoeft studied from 2006 to 2012 at the Academy of Media Arts Cologne and has won numerous awards, such as the Arbeitsstipendium of the Stiftung Kunstfonds (2017), the Förderpreis des Landes NRW (2010) or the scholarship of the Jan van Eyck Akademie Maastricht (2013-14). Hoeft has exhibited at the Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, Kunsthalle Wien, Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl, Kunstverein Leverkusen, Bunkier Sztuki Krakau, de Appel Arts Center Amsterdam, KIT Düsseldorf and KAI 10 – Arthena Foundation.


Two indoor plants, Dieffenbachia maculata and Monstera deliciosa, are placed on an electric turntable and move slowly around their own axis. Each time they rotate, their leaves swipe across the screen of a tablet PC, which shows keys on several key rings from several different perspectives. With each swipe, you see a slogan gradually appear across the screen spelling out: YOUR TRUE SELF. Polypropylene hollow chamber panels are mounted with complex aluminium suspensions on the walls of the exhibition. The surface is broken in many places: cable-ties pull the soft plastic at its corners under tension together and the exhibition title as well as arrows pointing in different directions were milled into the material. The porous, open areas reveal those elements that go rather unnoticed in the industry, and that hardly experience their qualitative esteem in daily viewing: outdoor advertising and architectural renderings on construction boards. In the exhibition, stock photographs are printed on the hollow chamber sheets. One can see landscape views similar to those from the Windows XP screen background and the photography from a large public functional architecture, reminiscent of an airport or an office building. Furthermore, different details of feet and legs are represented. The surfaces of these feet were perforated in some sensitive places by steel bolts, such as the ball of the foot, the heel, or the ankles. Shiny keys hang from these bolts, from which key rings are connected in complex arrangements. If you take a closer look, you will notice that these keys have no profile; they are key blanks Two indoor plants, Dieffenbachia maculata and Monstera deliciosa, are placed on an electric turntable and move slowly around their own axis. Each time they rotate, their leaves swipe across the screen of a tablet PC, which shows keys on several key rings from several different perspectives. With each swipe, you see a slogan gradually appear across the screen spelling out: YOUR TRUE SELF. Polypropylene hollow chamber panels are mounted with complex aluminium suspensions on the walls of the exhibition. The surface is broken in many places: cable-ties pull the soft plastic at its corners under tension together and the exhibition title as well as arrows pointing in different directions were milled into the material. The porous, open areas reveal those elements that go rather unnoticed in the industry, and that hardly experience their qualitative esteem in daily viewing: outdoor advertising and architectural renderings on construction boards. In the exhibition, stock photographs are printed on the hollow chamber sheets. One can see landscape views similar to those from the Windows XP screen background and the photography from a large public functional architecture, reminiscent of an airport or an office building. Furthermore, different details of feet and legs are represented. The surfaces of these feet were perforated in some sensitive places by steel bolts, such as the ball of the foot, the heel, or the ankles. Shiny keys hang from these bolts, from which key rings are connected in complex arrangements. If you take a closer look, you will notice that these keys have no profile; they are key blanks that decorate the feet like elaborate jewellery and, without their individual serrated profile, point away from their functional attributes.
The keys, cable-ties and polypropylene hollow chambers receive a new attention in the exhibition space with regard to their material qualities. The formal and material qualities are declared as the aesthetic element of the composition. They fit into a poetic pairing that makes the ciphers and materials of a synchronized and clocked society visible.

YOUR TRUE SELF - Is that the direction to which the arrows point? Will they take me to the place where the keys will fit? Just as the rotating plants set the rhythm for the change of direction, the arrows, like traffic signs and advertising messages, offer the recipient a supposed orientation aid in the chaos between systematic urban planning and industrial progress.
Jan Hoeft studied from 2006 to 2012 at the Academy of Media Arts Cologne and has won numerous awards, such as the Arbeitsstipendium of the Stiftung Kunstfonds (2017), the Förderpreis des Landes NRW (2010) or the scholarship of the Jan van Eyck Akademie Maastricht (2013-14). Hoeft has exhibited at the Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, Kunsthalle Wien, Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl, Kunstverein Leverkusen, Bunkier Sztuki Krakau, de Appel Arts Center Amsterdam, KIT Düsseldorf and KAI 10 – Arthena Foundation.

 


that decorate the feet like elaborate jewellery and, without their individual serrated profile, point away from their functional attributes.
The keys, cable-ties and polypropylene hollow chambers receive a new attention in the exhibition space with regard to their material qualities. The formal and material qualities are declared as the aesthetic element of the composition. They fit into a poetic pairing that makes the ciphers and materials of a synchronized and clocked society visible.

YOUR TRUE SELF - Is that the direction to which the arrows point? Will they take me to the place where the keys will fit? Just as the rotating plants set the rhythm for the change of direction, the arrows, like traffic signs and advertising messages, offer the recipient a supposed orientation aid in the chaos between systematic urban planning and industrial progress.
Jan Hoeft studied from 2006 to 2012 at the Academy of Media Arts Cologne and has won numerous awards, such as the Arbeitsstipendium of the Stiftung Kunstfonds (2017), the Förderpreis des Landes NRW (2010) or the scholarship of the Jan van Eyck Akademie Maastricht (2013-14). Hoeft has exhibited at the Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, Kunsthalle Wien, Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl, Kunstverein Leverkusen, Bunkier Sztuki Krakau, de Appel Arts Center Amsterdam, KIT Düsseldorf and KAI 10 – Arthena Foundation.

that decorate the feet like elaborate jewellery and, without their individual serrated profile, point away from their functional attributes.
The keys, cable-ties and polypropylene hollow chambers receive a new attention in the exhibition space with regard to their material qualities. The formal and material qualities are declared as the aesthetic element of the composition. They fit into a poetic pairing that makes the ciphers and materials of a synchronized and clocked society visible.

YOUR TRUE SELF - Is that the direction to which the arrows point? Will they take me to the place where the keys will fit? Just as the rotating plants set the rhythm for the change of direction, the arrows, like traffic signs and advertising messages, offer the recipient a supposed orientation aid in the chaos between systematic urban planning and industrial progress.
Jan Hoeft studied from 2006 to 2012 at the Academy of Media Arts Cologne and has won numerous awards, such as the Arbeitsstipendium of the Stiftung Kunstfonds (2017), the Förderpreis des Landes NRW (2010) or the scholarship of the Jan van Eyck Akademie Maastricht (2013-14). Hoeft has exhibited at the Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, Kunsthalle Wien, Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl, Kunstverein Leverkusen, Bunkier Sztuki Krakau, de Appel Arts Center Amsterdam, KIT Düsseldorf and KAI 10 – Arthena Foundation.

 

 

Previous

Previous

2020

2020

2019

2019

2018

2018

2017

2017

2016

2016

Hohe Straße 53

40213 Düsseldorf Germany

Hohe Straße 53

40213 Düsseldorf, Germany

Hohe Straße 53

40213 Düsseldorf, Germany

signupbutton

©2020
SETAREH X

©2020
SETAREH X

©2020
SETAREH X

Instagram         Artsy         Facebook         

Instagram         Facebook         Artsy

Instagram         Facebook         Artsy

Instagram              Facebook                Artsy