22.06—28.07.18
Group Exhibition
AFTERMATH

22.06—28.07.18
Group Exhibition
AFTERMATH

22.06—28.07.18
Group Exhibition
AFTERMATH

22.06—28.07.18
Group Exhibition
AFTERMATH

22.06—28.07.18
Group Exhibition
AFTERMATH

Tammo Lünemann, Joakim Ojanen, Kiko Pérez, Jim Thorell, Sam Windett
Curated by Pierre Knop

Tammo Lünemann, Joakim Ojanen, Kiko Pérez, Jim Thorell, Sam Windett
Curated by Pierre Knop

Tammo Lünemann, Joakim Ojanen, Kiko Pérez, Jim Thorell, Sam Windett
Curated by Pierre Knop

Tammo Lünemann, Joakim Ojanen, Kiko Pérez, Jim Thorell, Sam Windett
Curated by Pierre Knop

Tammo Lünemann, Joakim Ojanen,
Kiko Pérez, Jim Thorell, Sam Windett
Curated by Pierre Knop

The group show AFTERMATH presents works by Tammo Lünemann, Joakim Ojanen, Kiko Pérez, Jim Thorell and Sam Windett. The discourses put forward by these five young contemporary positions became fixed by the visual memory of the artist Pierre Knop, and the show represents the aftermath of his subjective reflections. At the same time, the exhibited works possess their own internal echo.

Traces of previous thoughts or processes linked to the pictorial composition become visible in the context of the exhibition.

The sculptor Tammo Lünemann reflects intensely on questions of materiality, but also of language, not least because of his own writing practice. In a type of collage the artist arranges text and image elements – at times very personal ones – onto a mundane looking bookstand. This functions as a connection between object and language providing a narrative frame for a seemingly timeless ensemble.

Departing from stylistic elements that are a cross between pop culture and street art, Joakim Ojanen’s traditionally crafted ceramic sculptures lead on to a deeply personal universe filled with unique characters. On first glance, these communally gathered figures appear comedic and grotesque. But on second glance, they refer to quiet, soft or even emotionally charged moments of human expression.

Kiko Pérez connects the concept of painting with the pictorial technique of collaging. The artist uses a special technique of delicate coloured paper cut-outs which he arranges onto canvas or wood. In production terms the paint is an important aspect in the sense that it colours the forms.

The group show AFTERMATH presents works by Tammo Lünemann, Joakim Ojanen, Kiko Pérez, Jim Thorell and Sam Windett. The discourses put forward by these five young contemporary positions became fixed by the visual memory of the artist Pierre Knop, and the show represents the aftermath of his subjective reflections. At the same time, the exhibited works possess their own internal echo.

Traces of previous thoughts or processes linked to the pictorial composition become visible in the context of the exhibition.

The sculptor Tammo Lünemann reflects intensely on questions of materiality, but also of language, not least because of his own writing practice. In a type of collage the artist arranges text and image elements – at times very personal ones – onto a mundane looking bookstand. This functions as a connection between object and language providing a narrative frame for a seemingly timeless ensemble.

Departing from stylistic elements that are a cross between pop culture and street art, Joakim Ojanen’s traditionally crafted ceramic sculptures lead on to a deeply personal universe filled with unique characters. On first glance, these communally gathered figures appear comedic and grotesque. But on second glance, they refer to quiet, soft or even emotionally charged moments of human expression.

Kiko Pérez connects the concept of painting with the pictorial technique of collaging. The artist uses a special technique of delicate coloured paper cut-outs which he arranges onto canvas or wood. In production terms the paint is an important aspect in the sense that it colours the forms.

The group show AFTERMATH presents works by Tammo Lünemann, Joakim Ojanen, Kiko Pérez, Jim Thorell and Sam Windett. The discourses put forward by these five young contemporary positions became fixed by the visual memory of the artist Pierre Knop, and the show represents the aftermath of his subjective reflections. At the same time, the exhibited works possess their own internal echo.

Traces of previous thoughts or processes linked to the pictorial composition become visible in the context of the exhibition.

The sculptor Tammo Lünemann reflects intensely on questions of materiality, but also of language, not least because of his own writing practice. In a type of collage the artist arranges text and image elements – at times very personal ones – onto a mundane looking bookstand. This functions as a connection between object and language providing a narrative frame for a seemingly timeless ensemble.

Departing from stylistic elements that are a cross between pop culture and street art, Joakim Ojanen’s traditionally crafted ceramic sculptures lead on to a deeply personal universe filled with unique characters. On first glance, these communally gathered figures appear comedic and grotesque. But on second glance, they refer to quiet, soft or even emotionally charged moments of human expression.

Kiko Pérez connects the concept of painting with the pictorial technique of collaging. The artist uses a special technique of delicate coloured paper cut-outs which he arranges onto canvas or wood. In production terms the paint is an important aspect in the sense that it colours the forms.

The group show AFTERMATH presents works by Tammo Lünemann, Joakim Ojanen, Kiko Pérez, Jim Thorell and Sam Windett. The discourses put forward by these five young contemporary positions became fixed by the visual memory of the artist Pierre Knop, and the show represents the aftermath of his subjective reflections. At the same time, the exhibited works possess their own internal echo.

Traces of previous thoughts or processes linked to the pictorial composition become visible in the context of the exhibition.

The sculptor Tammo Lünemann reflects intensely on questions of materiality, but also of language, not least because of his own writing practice. In a type of collage the artist arranges text and image elements – at times very personal ones – onto a mundane looking bookstand. This functions as a connection between object and language providing a narrative frame for a seemingly timeless ensemble.

Departing from stylistic elements that are a cross between pop culture and street art, Joakim Ojanen’s traditionally crafted ceramic sculptures lead on to a deeply personal universe filled with unique characters. On first glance, these communally gathered figures appear comedic and grotesque. But on second glance, they refer to quiet, soft or even emotionally charged moments of human expression.

Kiko Pérez connects the concept of painting with the pictorial technique of collaging. The artist uses a special technique of delicate coloured paper cut-outs which he arranges onto canvas or wood. In production terms the paint is an important aspect in the sense that it colours the forms.

The group show AFTERMATH presents works by Tammo Lünemann, Joakim Ojanen, Kiko Pérez, Jim Thorell and Sam Windett. The discourses put forward by these five young contemporary positions became fixed by the visual memory of the artist Pierre Knop, and the show represents the aftermath of his subjective reflections. At the same time, the exhibited works possess their own internal echo.

Traces of previous thoughts or processes linked to the pictorial composition become visible in the context of the exhibition.

The sculptor Tammo Lünemann reflects intensely on questions of materiality, but also of language, not least because of his own writing practice. In a type of collage the artist arranges text and image elements – at times very personal ones – onto a mundane looking bookstand. This functions as a connection between object and language providing a narrative frame for a seemingly timeless ensemble.

Departing from stylistic elements that are a cross between pop culture and street art, Joakim Ojanen’s traditionally crafted ceramic sculptures lead on to a deeply personal universe filled with unique characters. On first glance, these communally gathered figures appear comedic and grotesque. But on second glance, they refer to quiet, soft or even emotionally charged moments of human expression.

Kiko Pérez connects the concept of painting with the pictorial technique of collaging. The artist uses a special technique of delicate coloured paper cut-outs which he arranges onto canvas or wood. In production terms the paint is an important aspect in the sense that it colours the forms.

But in the end the painterly traces fully withdraw into the background. With their material finesse and the compositional elements’ dynamic shifting from painting to collage, Pérez’s works radiate with musical poetry.

Jim Thorell’s works are hybrids of drawings and paintings that lure the viewer into strange pictorial worlds. The figures who inhabit them appear surreal and fragmentary and are neither spatially nor temporally relatable. Thorell’s pictorial cosmos seems almost organic and, with its fluid colour-blocks and lines, highlights a soft, continuous inner force that subtly guides the viewer’s gaze whilst simultaneously allowing it to wander.

Sam Windett’s works are dominated by a constant interchange between painted and collaged moments. As an „all-over painting“ the surfaces and textures on the canvas also contribute to a moving, puzzle-like pictorial space. Each new layer veils what lies beneath and erases parts of the picture. The artist thereby generates an atmosphere that colours those background surfaces that shine through.

All five positions depict highly differing ways of dealing with the possibilities of painting and

sculpture. They skilfully negotiate varying form and material combinations and their inherent properties. This natural treatment of paint and form acts like a leitmotif that is woven through the works on show, ideally leaving a dynamic aftermath.

But in the end the painterly traces fully withdraw into the background. With their material finesse and the compositional elements’ dynamic shifting from painting to collage, Pérez’s works radiate with musical poetry.

Jim Thorell’s works are hybrids of drawings and paintings that lure the viewer into strange pictorial worlds. The figures who inhabit them appear surreal and fragmentary and are neither spatially nor temporally relatable. Thorell’s pictorial cosmos seems almost organic and, with its fluid colour-blocks and lines, highlights a soft, continuous inner force that subtly guides the viewer’s gaze whilst simultaneously allowing it to wander.

Sam Windett’s works are dominated by a constant interchange between painted and collaged moments. As an „all-over painting“ the surfaces and textures on the canvas also contribute to a moving, puzzle-like pictorial space. Each new layer veils what lies beneath and erases parts of the picture. The artist thereby generates an atmosphere that colours those background surfaces that shine through.

All five positions depict highly differing ways of dealing with the possibilities of painting and

sculpture. They skilfully negotiate varying form and material combinations and their inherent properties. This natural treatment of paint and form acts like a leitmotif that is woven through the works on show, ideally leaving a dynamic aftermath.

But in the end the painterly traces fully withdraw into the background. With their material finesse and the compositional elements’ dynamic shifting from painting to collage, Pérez’s works radiate with musical poetry.

Jim Thorell’s works are hybrids of drawings and paintings that lure the viewer into strange pictorial worlds. The figures who inhabit them appear surreal and fragmentary and are neither spatially nor temporally relatable. Thorell’s pictorial cosmos seems almost organic and, with its fluid colour-blocks and lines, highlights a soft, continuous inner force that subtly guides the viewer’s gaze whilst simultaneously allowing it to wander.

Sam Windett’s works are dominated by a constant interchange between painted and collaged moments. As an „all-over painting“ the surfaces and textures on the canvas also contribute to a moving, puzzle-like pictorial space. Each new layer veils what lies beneath and erases parts of the picture. The artist thereby generates an atmosphere that colours those background surfaces that shine through.

All five positions depict highly differing ways of dealing with the possibilities of painting and

sculpture. They skilfully negotiate varying form and material combinations and their inherent properties. This natural treatment of paint and form acts like a leitmotif that is woven through the works on show, ideally leaving a dynamic aftermath.

But in the end the painterly traces fully withdraw into the background. With their material finesse and the compositional elements’ dynamic shifting from painting to collage, Pérez’s works radiate with musical poetry.

Jim Thorell’s works are hybrids of drawings and paintings that lure the viewer into strange pictorial worlds. The figures who inhabit them appear surreal and fragmentary and are neither spatially nor temporally relatable. Thorell’s pictorial cosmos seems almost organic and, with its fluid colour-blocks and lines, highlights a soft, continuous inner force that subtly guides the viewer’s gaze whilst simultaneously allowing it to wander.

Sam Windett’s works are dominated by a constant interchange between painted and collaged moments. As an „all-over painting“ the surfaces and textures on the canvas also contribute to a moving, puzzle-like pictorial space. Each new layer veils what lies beneath and erases parts of the picture. The artist thereby generates an atmosphere that colours those background surfaces that shine through.

All five positions depict highly differing ways of dealing with the possibilities of painting and

sculpture. They skilfully negotiate varying form and material combinations and their inherent properties. This natural treatment of paint and form acts like a leitmotif that is woven through the works on show, ideally leaving a dynamic aftermath.

But in the end the painterly traces fully withdraw into the background. With their material finesse and the compositional elements’ dynamic shifting from painting to collage, Pérez’s works radiate with musical poetry.

Jim Thorell’s works are hybrids of drawings and paintings that lure the viewer into strange pictorial worlds. The figures who inhabit them appear surreal and fragmentary and are neither spatially nor temporally relatable. Thorell’s pictorial cosmos seems almost organic and, with its fluid colour-blocks and lines, highlights a soft, continuous inner force that subtly guides the viewer’s gaze whilst simultaneously allowing it to wander.

Sam Windett’s works are dominated by a constant interchange between painted and collaged moments. As an „all-over painting“ the surfaces and textures on the canvas also contribute to a moving, puzzle-like pictorial space. Each new layer veils what lies beneath and erases parts of the picture. The artist thereby generates an atmosphere that colours those background surfaces that shine through.

All five positions depict highly differing ways of dealing with the possibilities of painting and

sculpture. They skilfully negotiate varying form and material combinations and their inherent properties. This natural treatment of paint and form acts like a leitmotif that is woven through the works on show, ideally leaving a dynamic aftermath.

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